Modifications &
Enforcement of Orders

Post-Decree Modifications

Life changes, and with that, your separation agreement or allocation of parental responsibilities order may also need to change. Just because life was a certain way when the agreement was made, that doesn’t mean it has to remain that way. Whether your former spouse or co-parent has moved or you wish to modify your current parenting time schedule or decision-making regime, the experienced attorneys at Gendelman Law Group are here to assist you.

An Agreement That Makes Sense for Your Life

Though you may have received “permanent orders” from the Court in your separation, divorce, or custody case, your life can end up looking much different than you anticipated. Children mature, employment status changes, relocations take place, etc. The Courts understand this. While you try to plan for every possible option, there are many situations which would not ordinarily occur to you. If your life has changed, so can the Court orders you may have received in the past. The goal of post-decree modifications is to make changes that accurately reflect the current lives of those involved and the best interests of any children who may be impacted.

Let Us Help

Many post-decree cases require that either you or your attorney file specific legal requests (called motions) with the Court for various changes or amendments to the permanent orders. Frequently, post-decree issues are fiercely contested, as the parties have been unable to resolve the problem among themselves and decide to return to court. You can benefit from vigorous representation to protect yourself, your wallet, and your family.

Post-Decree Enforcement

Imagine this: You and your former spouse just spent a significant amount of money, time, and emotional energy coming to what you thought was the perfect agreement regarding parenting time after your divorce. Just when you think things are settled and you are moving on with your life, your spouse fails to cooperate in facilitating your parenting time. We can help. Whether you are having trouble obtaining funds or possessions you were awarded in your divorce or one party failed to pay their child support obligation, Gendelman Law Group is here to bring our expertise in resolving these issues.

Everyone Is Held Accountable

It is important to read over your separation agreement, parenting plan, or permanent orders to ensure that you are compliant with the terms yourself. You won’t want to be pointing the blame at someone else when you are likewise not complying with the court’s order. You’ll also want to be aware of any conditions you must meet before you can take legal action, such as giving written notice to the other party or attempting to mediate. It is essential to take notes and document any instances where the other party has not been complying with the terms. This could include notes regarding violations of the parenting schedule or bank statements showing late or missing child support or alimony payments.

Innocent misunderstandings are the source of countless enforcement actions. Sometimes reaching out informally can help correct a simple misunderstanding of the other party’s obligations. However, this isn’t usually the only necessary step in being sure your former spouse will comply moving forward. Even if your case appears likely to be resolved informally or with mediation, your rights should be protected throughout the process.

Contact Us

Our attorneys have participated in countless mediations and contested hearings to address modifications and enforcement of orders and have advanced training and experience in Family Law. That difference can mean countless dollars or days lost. Call Gendelman Law group at (720) 213-0687 or contact our attorneys by using the button below.

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